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“Maybe the question has never really been about whether you see your glass as half full or half empty. After all, every season is at once fraught with scarcity and blessed with abundance. We can work hard, play hard, love hard, and pray for grace, and still, the unexpected lands on every doorstep, sweeps in, and changes everything. And in those moments, keeping perspective is about seeing that we have a glass at all – and a choice for how we’ll fill it. That in the midst of owning our reality, we can choose to see opportunity, and in the setbacks or “not yets,” we find new strength to grow.
-Charis Dietz, Magnolia Magazine, Fall 2023

As disability and special needs mothers, we are well-acquainted with seasons, losses, setbacks, and change. We understand that we are living between the now and the not yet – the tension of what our lives were hoped to be and the actuality of what they currently are. The tension of current reality and the hope we have in eternity.

My human tendency is to see my glass as half-full. I rarely celebrate the wins, small victories, and meager milestones my children reach or even the ones I achieve. Maybe you’re like me, and you need to focus a bit more on the small victories, the ways we can be thankful and praise God for growth, no matter if others notice.

We often forget to celebrate these as we’re always looking for perfection, striving, improving, and gaining.

In a month fraught with change and the difficult task of mothering teenagers, I’ve had a difficult time focusing on the wins. If I have to explain one more time about not using words such as “always, never, and I’m so stupid” to communicate, I’ll scream. Or you might find me hiding away on a beach somewhere in Michigan in the fetal position.

Very often, we run at the speed of life, forgetting to rest and take an evaluation of our growth. What has changed? Our gaze focuses on what we’ve lost and our pain. There’s certainly time for that, and we need to allow space for that, but we also need to leave space for celebration. We need to tell our kids we’re proud of them and rejoice in their victories and ours.

Possibly, you’re not at a place to celebrate even the smallest of victories. You’re wondering if you even have a glass to fill. You’re still trying to find it. That’s okay. Our glass is our life with all its ups and downs. We all have a glass, and when life throws curveballs and uncertainty rains down, let’s remember, “…we have a choice in how we fill it.”

My prayer for you today is threefold.
1. May you see the glass you’re holding – it’s your life! Life is a precious gift.
2. May you take a moment to evaluate your day or week and evaluate how you’ve lived, loved, forgiven, rested, worked, and praised.
3. May you find one small win to celebrate today, and especially if it’s how you’ve grown.
​​

Authored By:

Carrie M. Holt
Speaker~Podcaster~Author
carrie@carriemholt.com
https://takeheartspecialmoms.com
https://carriemholt.com

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